Turning to short prose, I’ll finish this series on short but stunning writing by reviewing an eagerly awaited recent addition to our bookshelves: Caitlin Moran’s new book Moranifesto, a collection of her columns and opinion pieces for the Times and others. Arranged loosely by theme, this is a delightful combination of humour, pop culture and reviews and heartfelt opinion, particularly on issues affecting poverty and feminism.

My appetite was whetted by two excerpts from the book published recently in the Guardian (on how to get your voice heard on the Internet while still being nice) and a letter to girls who are struggling to get through pain or abuse which she read as part of the Letters Live event in London this week. My suggestion? Read these, then go and buy the book!

What to Read Next

  • Caitlin Moran’s bestseller How To Be A Woman (great review here by Nicholas Lezard, who recommends it highly, despite not being a woman himself) and Moranthology (in which Moran explains how she discovered that even a girl from a poor home in Wolverhampton can write material that others want to read).
  • As Used On The Famous Nelson Mandela by Mark Thomas – if you needed more evidence that humour can be the best way to tell a serious story, read Mark Thomas’ cutting analysis of Britain’s lax arms export policy (so lax that a bunch of convent schoolgirls could buy torture equipment, which proved very embarrassing when BAE and their ilk came to meet their new “clients”!)
  • The Rainbow People of God by Desmond Tutu – a sparkling collection of speeches and letters telling the story firsthand of the battle to end apartheid in South Africa.
  • The Bedside Guardian – If you want to remember the key events and perspectives from a particular year, I highly recommend the Bedside Guardian, being a collection of the best cultural, comment and news pieces from the year. Among other things, it’s really useful to fill in the details of things you half remember – try comparing coverage of the first and second Gulf Wars, for example.
Advertisements